Home Horticultural shows RHS Chatsworth 2018: show gardens

RHS Chatsworth 2018: show gardens

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Hay Time in the Dales Garden. Picture; Chris Myers
Hay Time in the Dales Garden. Picture; Chris Myers

Hay Time in the Dales

Sponsor: Johnsons of Whixley and Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust. Designer: Chris Myers. Contractor: Creations & Installations

97 per cent of wildflower meadows in the UK have disappeared and this garden aims to showcase their importance and beauty and raise support to change. It is a reflection of life in the rural Yorkshire Dales.

A small barn is converted into a dwelling, with broadleaved woodland filled with native species and a meadow packed with wildflowers. Atlantic ivy is used as a screen.

Planting: A soft natural colour scheme, with plants that are closely related to native plants found in a meadow. Key plants – broadleaved trees including sessile oak, cranesbills and topiary created from native field maples.

CCLA - A Family Garden. Picture; Amanda Waring and Laura Arison
CCLA – A Family Garden. Picture; Amanda Waring and Laura Arison

CCLA – A Family Garden

Sponsor: CCLA. Designer: Amanda Waring & Laura Arison. Contractor: GK Wilson Landscapes Services

A Family Garden is designed as space for families to sit, relax, entertain and connect with nature’s life cycles.

The main structure is a pavilion made of circular blackboards, with a ‘floating’ children’s play tunnel of porcelain paving. The two water features provide entertainment and sound.

Planting: An informal approach weaves together ornamentals and edibles such as Hydrangea paniculata and Phaseolus coccineus, alongside Zanthoxylum simulans to provide texture, colour, scent and a sensory experience. Key plants – Paulownia tomentosa, Pyrus salicifolia Pendular, Fagus Sylvatica Purpurea and Zanthoxylum simulans.

The John Deere Garden. Picture; Elspeth Stockwell and Jo Fairfax
The John Deere Garden. Picture; Elspeth Stockwell and Jo Fairfax

The John Deere Garden: celebrating 100 years of tractors

Sponsor: John Deere. Designer: Elspeth Stockwell. Contractor: David Greaves

Celebrating 100 years of tractors; a period throughout which innovation has revolutionised agriculture. The garden features a circular sculpture of 100 golden tractors, with the planting mixing meadow-like and ‘monoculture’ planting styles.

A charred oak backdrop and circular seating reference the punctuation of farm buildings across the pastoral landscape.

Planting: Molinia caerulea is planted en masse to mimic fields of corn; Papaver cambricum and ferns at the entrance reference the John Deere colours. Other key plants: Camassia leichtlinii caerulea, Betula pendula multi stems and Digitalis lutea.

The Macmillan Legacy Garden. Picture; Michael Coley
The Macmillan Legacy Garden. Picture; Michael Coley

The MacMillan Legacy Garden

Sponsor: Macmillan Cancer Support. Designer: Michael Coley. Contractor: Smartscape Cardiff Ltd

This is a place of contemplation and reflection, taking its inspiration from the work of the charity and the importance of legacy.

The garden is centered around a large oak, representing strength and resilience, surrounded by large boulders representing the chaos that cancer can cause.

Smaller oak saplings and seedlings are woven through the rest of the planting, which melts into a lush meadow. The stone is from a quarry within the Chatsworth Estate.

Planting: Digitalis purpurea, Molinia caerulea, Rosa canina, Verbascum thapsus and Quercus robur.

The Great Outdoors Garden. Picture; Phil Hearst
The Great Outdoors Garden. Picture; Phil Hearst

The Great Outdoors

Sponsor: Phil Hirst Garden Design Ltd, Allgreen Group, Handspring Design, Knowl Park Nurseries and GardenStyle. Designer: Phil Hirst. Contractor: GardenStyle

This garden is a celebration of the natural environment of Sheffield and North Derbyshire.

It evokes the beauty of the woodland and moors using oak as a hard landscaping material in a slightly tilted pergola; as paving and as a feature screen to evoke the rocky sandstone ‘edges’ of the northern Peak District. A water feature pays tribute to Derbyshire’s peat wetlands.

Planting: The planting style reflects the native planting of the area. Key plants: Iris sibirica, Matteuccia struthiopteris, Deschampsia caespitose and Betula utilis.

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Mandy Watson is a freelance journalist and an incurable plantaholic. MandyCanUDigIt grew from the tiny seed of a Twitter account into the rainforest of information you see before you. Gardening columnist for the Sunderland Echo, Shields Gazette and Hartlepool Mail and editor of the Teesdale Mercury Magazine. Attracted by anything rebellious, exotic and nerdy, even after all these years. Passionate about northern England and gardens everywhere. Falls over a lot.

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