Home Flower seeds Year of the Nasturtium 2019

Year of the Nasturtium 2019

Nasturtium Baby Deep Rose. Picture; Chiltern Seeds
Nasturtium Baby Deep Rose. Picture; Chiltern Seeds

Decorative and edible flower stars

A classic in the flower garden, as a companion plant and increasingly as an edible… 2019 has been designated the Year of the Nasturtium.

Rather than the usual orange or yellow climbers/sprawlers, there’s a wide colour range now in tall and compact varieties. Never mind how they look – they’re ideal for children or beginners to grow and good for wildlife, too.

If you’re wondering who decides which flower is highlighted, Fleuroselect Home Garden Association, an international non-profit organisation, chooses a vegetable and flower each year, designed to boost seed and plant sales.

Here are my favourites this year…

Baby Deep Rose

This new variety is a breakthrough in nasturtium breeding with its very compact habit and much smaller, darker leaves and stunning, very dark pink prolific flowers, 30cm, £2.25, www.chilternseeds.co.uk.

Nasturtium Orchid Flame. Picture; Thompson & Morgan
Nasturtium Orchid Flame. Picture; Thompson & Morgan

Orchid Flame

Not only do the flowers resemble orchids, but they also change colour, from red with yellow splashes and veining, to fully yellow. The final flower colour depends on weather and temperature, but no two flowers will be exactly alike.

It reaches 30cm high, spreading or cascading to 90-120cm, so it’s a great variety for hanging baskets or growing over a trellis, £2.99, exclusive to www.thompson-morgan.co.uk.

Nasturtium Bloody Mary. Picture; Suttons
Nasturtium Bloody Mary. Picture; Suttons

Bloody Mary

Blood-red blooms with a flecked colour pattern and peppery, watercress taste. Height 20-30cm, spread 20-30cm, £2.99, www.suttons.co.uk.

Nasturtium Tall Mix Organic Seed Range. Picture; Suttons
Nasturtium Tall Mix Organic Seed Range. Picture; Suttons

Tall Mix Organic

A free flowering and rapid climber which attracts aphids away from vegetables. Height 180cm. Organic seeds are produced without the use of synthetic fertilisers and pesticides, £2.29, new to www.dobies.co.uk.

Nasturtium Empress of India, my garden, October 2014
Nasturtium Empress of India, my garden, October 2014

Empress of India

A popular variety with masses of deep-red, semi-double flowers over purple-green leaves. Ideal for covering unsightly banks or fences, 180cm, £1.60, www.plant-world-seeds.com.

Nasturtium Salmon Baby. Picture; Mr Fothergill's
Nasturtium Salmon Baby. Picture; Mr Fothergill’s

Salmon Baby

Mainly semi-double unusual salmon-pink blooms. Compact at 30cm, so ideal for borders, ground cover and pots, £2.35, www.mr-fothergills.co.uk.

Nasturtiums Collection. Picture; Johnsons
Nasturtiums Collection. Picture; Johnsons

Nasturtiums Collection

  • Alaska Mixed: single flowers set off by pale green marbled foliage.
  • Golden Jewel: semi-double golden flowers on compact plants. Perfect for pots and tubs.
  • Mahogany Gleam: semi-double flowers on semi-trailing plants. Great for ground cover and containers.
  • Peach Melba: semi-double flowers with salmon dots, on compact plants.
  • Tall Mixed: bright single flowers on vigorous plants.
  • Tom Thumbs Mixed: compact plants with single flowers in a good range of bright colours. Height: 25cm-180cm, £4.99, www.johnsons-seeds.com.
Nasturtium Jewel Cherry Rose. Picture; DT Brown
Nasturtium Jewel Cherry Rose. Picture; DT Brown

Jewel Cherry Rose

Semi-double blooms in shades of cherry-pink, £2.09, www.dtbrownseeds.co.uk.

Edible Nasturtiums. Picture; Franchi Seeds of Italy
Nasturtium Edible Flowers For The Kitchen. Picture; Franchi Seeds of Italy

Nasturtium Edible Flowers For The Kitchen

Spicy flavour for salads or use as a garnish, £2.99, www.seedsofitaly.com.

Scarlet Munchkin

Red flowers to scramble up fences and trellises, 180cm, £1.95, www.higgledygarden.com.

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Mandy Watson is a freelance journalist and an incurable plantaholic. MandyCanUDigIt grew from the tiny seed of a Twitter account into the rainforest of information you see before you. Gardening columnist for the Sunderland Echo, Shields Gazette and Hartlepool Mail and editor of the Teesdale Mercury Magazine. Attracted by anything rebellious, exotic and nerdy, even after all these years. Passionate about northern England and gardens everywhere. Falls over a lot.

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