Home Gardening products and reviews Bokashi Composter by Hozelock review

Bokashi Composter by Hozelock review

Concentrated plant food from my Bokashi Composter
Concentrated plant food from my Bokashi Composter

A great piece of kit for kitchen and garden

If you want to reduce your kitchen waste and turn it into something useful, look no further than the Hozelock Bokashi Composter.

It ticks all the boxes and more:

  • Compact enough to sit on your bench top (although mine’s in the conservatory (other side of the kitchen door).
  • You can add all food waste – including cooked food and fish bones, so no more sending it to landfill.
  • Provides you with both concentrated liquid plant food (dilute x100) and a compost accelerator.
  • The fertiliser liquid can be used to clean drains and septic tanks.
Bokashi Composter. Picture; Hozelock
Bokashi Composter. Picture; Hozelock

How the Bokashi Composter works

Supplied with the composter is Bokashi bran. Invented in Japan, it uses a combination of bran and effective microorganisms, which acts as an activator and composts all biological kitchen waste, including table scraps, meat, fish and dairy.

In just five days, you can drain off a fertilizer liquid from the bottom tap into the handy cup provided.

In 15-20 days, the fermented solid waste can be added to a conventional compost heap or dug straight into the ground where it quickly breaks down. I used my first batch in the bottom of a bean trench.

The composter is an anaerobic system (works without oxygen, so always make sure the lid is sealed).

Simply add 20g (a tiny amount – in the picture below, the bran is the tiny brown specks on the waste) of the bokashi bran in the base, put in a layer of waste and add another 20g on top, tamping it down with the supplied tool to remove air pockets.

When the bin is full, add another 20g layer of bran and leave it for 14 days. Continue draining fertiliser liquid off every three-five days.

What goes into my Bokashi Composter
What goes into my Bokashi Composter

The verdict

Of all the products I saw at the Garden Press Event, so far this one comes out tops.

It’s ideal for the smallest garden and kitchen, with free plant food literally on tap and fermented waste that you can dig directly into your soil if you don’t have a big compost bin.

It’s amazing how much can fit into the 16-litre bin so you’re not constantly emptying it and there’s no unpleasant smell like normal kitchen caddies, as it’s airtight and the bran/microorganisms deal with that.

There’s much less emptying of the normal kitchen bin and no smell from that either.

Made from recycled plastic, it fits in with my vow of not introducing more plastic into my garden unless there is no other alternative.

All-in price

It’s also affordable, with a RRP of £55, which includes 1kg of Bokashi bran (should last a couple of months and is widely available), a dosing cup, dosing scoop, drain sieve, handle and levelling trowel.

When you consider the amount of free plant food and compost accelerator/compost you’re getting, less effort emptying your bin and less waste going to landfill, it’s a win-win buy.

My family (typical) had only one small quibble – they didn’t like the smell of the bran. I disagree, it’s not unpleasant, but does have a distinctive odour in the bag (I believe there are molasses in it and that’s what I can detect).

If you want a productive, organic garden this season and for years to come (there’s a two-year guarantee), this is the one thing to buy.

For more information and stockists, visit www.hozelock.com.

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Mandy Watson is a freelance journalist and an incurable plantaholic. MandyCanUDigIt grew from the tiny seed of a Twitter account into the rainforest of information you see before you. Gardening columnist for the Sunderland Echo, Shields Gazette and Hartlepool Mail and editor of the Teesdale Mercury Magazine. Attracted by anything rebellious, exotic and nerdy, even after all these years. Passionate about northern England and gardens everywhere. Falls over a lot.

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