Home My garden Coronavirus: what to do with waste when garden rubbish collections stop

Coronavirus: what to do with waste when garden rubbish collections stop

Painting over the cracks - trying to hide compost/rubbish corner
Painting over the cracks - trying to hide compost/rubbish corner

Blog: Our council tells us not to spring clean!

It’s a very minor thing in the current crisis, but like some other local authorities, Gateshead Council (where I live) has suspended garden rubbish collections.

We’ve also been asked not to spring clean or create too much rubbish to ease the burden on the refuse service, which is fair enough, but three weeks too late for most of the people I live near – they’ve been going through every room in the house!

As the law of Sod would have it, the last garden collection was at the end of October (I’d completely filled mine two days later).

There's jasmine on that bamboo fence!
There’s jasmine on that bamboo fence!

Hacking merrily away

Even though Gary’s taken my hackings to the tip on many occasions, since lockdown I’ve managed to fill 13 refuse sacks with bulky hedge trimmings (part of my masochistic restoration of the 9ft hedge without the aid of electric/battery tools and mostly by blunt secateurs).

Time to get those compost bins back in action. I do have a small area where they live – which was completely covered with old bricks, big branches and general crap (thanks, garden helpers).

I don’t have a ‘before’ picture to show you – let’s face it, the ‘after’ is bad enough as I’ve always avoided taking photos of the dreaded tip area. Every garden, no matter how small, needs one and now’s the time to get it sorted.

I must empty those blue trugs...
I must empty those blue trugs…

A hateful task

It’s a hateful task but I’m glad I did it. Anything that can’t be composted is bagged up ready to go to the tip when it opens, hidden behind a bamboo screen, which now has jasmine trained over it.

Those ever-handy spare bricks are neatly stacked and I can actually get compost out of the bottom of the bins, while useful twiggy branches for plant supports lie within easy reach on top.

Of course, the ever-intrusive blue trugs make a photobombing appearance but at least they have a home now! If I’m not careful, this garden may become a well-oiled machine…

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