Home Flower seeds New flower seeds from Dobies for 2021

New flower seeds from Dobies for 2021

Calendula Bulls Eye. Picture; Dobies
Calendula Bulls Eye. Picture; Dobies

My top 10 blooming marvellous choices

Dobies of Devon has 17 new ornamental varieties for 2021, from easy-to-grow annuals, border showstoppers to reliable perennials – here are my favourites.

Calendula Bulls Eye

Easy to grow and ideal for beginners or children, this Fleuroselect Novelty winner with ‘pom-pom’ sunshine yellow blooms up to 6cm across with a contrasting ‘Bulls Eye’ centre.

This pot marigold is compact, perfect for pots or patio containers, height 40–50cm, spread 41–50cm, £2.49.

Primrose Amore. Picture; Dobies
Primrose Amore. Picture; Dobies

Primrose Amore

Perennial Primrose Amore produces double flowers the colour of a peach melba in late winter and early spring with a lovely light scent.

Great for borders, hanging baskets or containers, height of 11–20cm, spread 21–30cm, £3.99.

Zinnia Dobies Florists Pastels. Picture; Dobies
Zinnia Dobies Florist Pastels. Picture; Dobies

Zinnia Dobies Florist Pastels

ideal for the middle of a border, Zinnia Dobies Florist Pastels Mixed are loved by florists for their delicate pastel colours and long stems. Blooms can be single, semi-double and double.

Try them in containers too, height 51-60cm, £2.99.

Sweet Pea Fire & Ice. Picture; Dobies
Sweet Pea Fire & Ice. Picture; Dobies

Sweet Pea Fire & Ice

Beautifully shaded flowers in white, pink and purple, with a sweet lingering fragrance and long stems for cutting from June to September.

Great for containers, this Modern Grandiflora type grows to a height of 151–200cm, spread 21–30cm. Train them up trellises and obelisks, £2.99.

Coreopsis Amulet. Picture; Dobies
Coreopsis Amulet. Picture; Dobies

Coreopsis Amulet

These dainty burnt red blooms sit above amazing feathery foliage that seemingly covers the ground around the plant. They’re heat-tolerant, flowering throughout the summer, adding darker contrasts to container displays.

Coreopsis is a perennial and hardy, the daisy-like flowers are compact, height 21-30cm, spread 21-30cm, £1.99.

Cosmos Fizzy Purple. Picture; Dobies
Cosmos Fizzy Purple. Picture; Dobies

Cosmos Fizzy Purple

The rare, almost purple flowers of Fizzy Purple have an extra set of petals in the centre, giving the flowers an effervescent look. They’re loved by bees and other pollinators and are ideal as cut flowers.

Growing to a height of 91–100cm, they tower over other varieties, £2.49.

Lavender Lady

This compact first-year flowering perennial doesn’t split or sprawl and is an AAS award winner. Lady’s outstanding flowers and strong scent make it perfect for path edging, beds, borders, or pots.

The flowers are edible – add them to sugar and use it in cakes or biscuits. Height 41–50cm, spread 41–50cm, £2.99.

Nasturtium Baby Orange. Picture; Dobies
Nasturtium Baby Orange. Picture; Dobies

Nasturtium Baby Orange

A Fleuroselect winner, Baby Orange has a ball-like habit covered in flowers, with small, dark green leaves contrasting against the tangerine orange flowers.

Grow in the corners of veg beds as they won’t take over or grow in old buckets. Leaves and petals can be added to salads, seedpods can be pickled and used like capers. Height 31–40cm, spread 21–30cm, Rob Smith Range, £2.50.

Rudbeckia Sahara. Picture; Dobies
Rudbeckia Sahara. Picture; Dobies

Rudbeckia Sahara

Vintage shades of copper, amber, gold and burnt red with flowers up to 13cm wide, great in beds, borders and large containers for late summer and autumn colour.

Rudbeckia Sahara is ideal for cut flowers too, height 51–60cm, spread 51–60cm, Rob Smith Range, £2.

Cosmos Pink Popsocks. Picture; Dobies
Cosmos Pink Popsocks. Picture; Dobies

Cosmos Pink Popsocks

Pink Popsocks is a tall variety, growing to 51–60cm, with a ‘powder-puff’ centre, creating a stunning contrast of colours – and they’re loved by pollinators.

Great for pots, beds and borders, they flower from June–September, Rob Smith Range, £3.50.

For more details, visit www.dobies.co.uk.

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